William Saito’s Life

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William Saito is a highly successful entrepreneur. He has spent the majority of his life involved with the immersing technology out of the 1970’s and through the 1990’s. He started his own software company in college right from his dorm room and had held jobs all the way up to the Japanese government as an advisor for cybersecurity.

William Saito’s parents emigrated from Japan to southern California during his childhood. As he grew up and had to learn English as a second language, he became fascinated with all things technological and what makes things work. His parents even had to take a second mortgage on their home so they could afford William a personal computer.

As William headed to high school, he was offered an internship by Merrill Lynch to write computer programs. He took it, and on the weekends he would go over very complicated calculations, and the stockbrokers would recheck his work. William Saito has said before, that at the time, he did not even know who Merrill Lynch was, but he enjoyed the job.

William entered college early since he had finished high school in three years. As time went on, he became an advanced pre-med student, and yet he was a CEO of his own software company called I/O Software, Inc. He claims that since he was so young and considered by many of his peers to be uncool, he devoted more of his time to his company.

As he continued to progress with his company, an accidental talk with Sony paved the way to his future. The discussion was concerning fingerprint scanning, personal computers, and security. Even in the 1990’s, Sony was still far behind in the computer realm, and this only boosted them further by taking on William Saito’s ideas. Sony collaborated with I/O’s software and developed the fingerprint scanner. This success led to a lot of attention for William Saito and eventually Microsoft acquired his company.

William Saito’s thoughts for any entrepreneur is that now is the time; use this time to grow your idea. Learn through the financial crises and during the good times. It is okay to fail; it is part of growing and learning in life.

 

 

 

https://saitohome.com/

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